tourism information

Akiyoshidai
Akiyoshidai
Akiyoshidai is the largest karst plateau in Japan, and has been designated a quasi-national park and Special Natural Monument.
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Akiyoshido
Akiyoshido
"Akiyoshido Cave," the Orient's best large limestone cavern, is located a hundred meters underground and opens on the south foot of Akiyoshidai Plateau. It was named by Emperor Hirohito in 1926 when he was crown prince and went on a sightseeing excursion through it.
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Kagekiyodo
Kagekiyodo
Heike Warlord Taira-no-Kagekiyo, who lost at the Battle of Dannoura, is said to have hidden in this cave. The cave has many features that are named after Kagekiyo.
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Taishodo
Taishodo
Located at the northeastern corner of Akiyoshidai Plateau Quasi-National Park, Taishodo Cave has been called the "Cattle Hiding Cave" since ancient times.
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shopping information

shopping information
Pears (nashi) grown on the special karst plateau of the Akiyoshidai Plateau region are particularly sweet and high in quality, and are a favorite of many visitors.
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Mine-city
ramsar

Are you familiar with the Ramsar Convention?

The groundwater system of the Akiyoshidai Plateau was formally registered in November 2005 at the ninth Ramsar Conference of the Parties.
A brief description of the Ramsar Convention and the type of convention that it is will be given here. Also, the history of Akiyoshidai's world-recognized groundwater system will be explained.
ramsar With growing recognition of the importance of wetlands, swamps, tidelands, and other wetlands, an "International Conference on the Conservation of Wetlands and Waterfowl" was held in 1971 in the Iranian city of Ramsar along the Caspian Sea coast, where "The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat" was adopted (taking effect in December 1975). Later, this convention came to be called the "Ramsar Convention," named after the location of the international conference where the convention was adopted.
The Ramsar Convention was the first agreement established between governments that focused on the conservation and wise use of natural resources. Working under the key words "waterfowl habitat conservation" in particular, the convention placed emphasis on the preservation and wise use of wetland ecosystems and biodiversity, and established measures that each of the participating countries should implement.
As of November 6, 2005, 147 countries (1,524 sites) worldwide were signatories of the Ramsar Convention.
In October 1980 Japan became a signatory of the convention. By that time, thirteen sites in Japan, including the Kushiro Marsh and Lake Biwa, were already registered. In November 8-15, 2005, at the ninth Conference of the Parties, held in the Ugandan capital of Kampala in East Africa, a total of twenty sites were newly registered, including the Akiyoshidai Plateau groundwater system, giving Japan a total of 33 wetlands registered with the convention.